Welcome to Technofeminist Pedagogies in Public and Private Spaces (2011)

Posted April 26, 2011 by Brittany
Categories: Uncategorized

The goal of this half-day workshop is to revisit both feminist and technofeminist (Wajcman, 2004) theory and the complexity of digital pedagogy in a Web 2.0 era. This workshop extends conversations begun at our C&W 2010 half-day workshop, “Remixing Technofeminist Pedagogies,” providing both new and returning workshop participants alike alternative, theory-to-practice approaches to technofeminist pedagogies.  While last year’s session focused on technofeminist pedagogies applied to specific tools, this session will engage a series of pedagogical topics as participants explore some of the tools and practices that may support an individual technofeminist teaching philosophy. Special emphasis will be placed on helping participants develop multimodal assignments, with attention to how approaching digital tools within feminist frameworks may help to level the playing field for our students within public and private spaces.

Participants will gain a new theoretical and pedagogical understanding of technofeminist principles and be able to employ these principles to bridge public and private spaces, as well as academic and community spheres to foster productive learning and teaching.  Additionally, participants will leave the workshop with a series of shared assignment/projects for use in both academic and community contexts.

Workshop facilitators will foster break-out group discussions on topics such as collaboration, assessment, empowerment, and service/activism with a technofeminist focus.  Large- and small-group discussions will foster a broader definition of technological literacy acquisition and application as a means to move beyond functional to critical and rhetorical literacies.

Through mini-presentations, group work, and reporting, this interactive half-day workshop will address the following questions:

  • What makes pedagogical practices both feminist and technofeminist?
  • How does technofeminist pedagogy encourage collaboration?
  • What role does technofeminist pedagogy play in assessment?
  • How can technofeminist pedagogy promote empowerment, service, and activism?
  • What tools can foster collaboration, assessment, empowerment, and service/activism in the writing classroom?
  • What role does public and private writing play in collaboration, assessment, empowerment, and service/activism?’
  • What challenges are associated with technofeminist pedagogies? How do we address these challenges?
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Welcome to Remixing (Techno)Feminist Pedagogies: The Workshop

Posted April 18, 2010 by kristineblair
Categories: Uncategorized

The goal of this half-day workshop is to remix both feminist and technofeminist theory and specific digital pedagogical practices in an era of Web 2.0, helping participants develop multimodal assignments and select digital tools within a feminist pedagogical framework in order to level the playing field for our students within virtual classroom and community contexts. Workshop facilitators will thus foster a broadened definition of technological literacy acquisition that is consistent with a move away from purely functional literacy to address critical and rhetorical literacies, including an understanding of how 21st-century multimodal composing processes can help to transform cultural norms about difference and traditional expectations of who is and is not technologically literate.

Through mini-presentations, small-group work and reporting, and online communication forums, our interactive half-day workshop will address the following questions:

  • In what ways can digital writing and communication tools enable specific technofeminist pedagogical practices, including establishing multiple points of access for students and teachers; fostering collaboration and mentoring; and valuing difference?
  • What makes such pedagogical practices both feminist and technofeminist?
  • What tools help deploy and sustain these practices: blogs, microblogs, other social networking applications?
  • What multimodal composing genres (e.g., literacy biographies) help to privilege a multiplicity of voices?
  • How do we assess the effectiveness of our approach on students’ comfort with, attitudes toward, and progress in developing digital identities?
  • How and why should we communicate the philosophies behind our pedagogies to students, colleagues, and larger academic and external communities?